Posted in diy

{Creative Palette} Cheese Tray & Crate Planter

Kelly at 2nd Chance Restoration was back at her DIY Creative Palette classes in April – this month we made a cheese tray and a planter! I was super excited for the planter since spring has been long awaited and spring flowers always make everything more cheerful.

Like always, we started by sanding our first project – the planter. we started with an unfinished wooden crate, like this one you can find at Michael’s. We then stained it with a Fusion’s Satin & Finishing Oil – that would allow us to put the planters outside. Because the inside would be lined later, we only needed to stain the outside. Kelly offered a grey and a brown – I chose to do the grey. While we let those dry, we started on our cheese trays – sanding and then staining. The tray itself can be made from any piece of wood, ours were circular, though other shaped would work too! For the circle, any hardware or craft store should carry tabletops, a small one is perfect for this project. For the tray, I did brown since it’s going to be a gift, otherwise I would have done grey to match my tray I made last year!

While we continued to let everything dry, we started on the cheese cutting board itself – and made them just like the ones from the Cricut 101 class I did with Shauna back at Kelly’s in February. Since these for for cheese trays, we had sayings that played on the names of cheese to pick from. Kelly had premade the vinyl cutouts, and we applied them to the back of cutting boards from the dollar store – I did a square cutting board, but she also had circular ones available.

Once the cutting board was done, our planters were relatively dry – so it was time to add wheels to the bottom 4 corners. Most used a drill to make it easier to screw them on, but you know me, I had to do something differently, so I used a regular old crew driver, but it worked out just fine! Then we took black plastic garbage bags which were cut open to be one large piece of plastic, and lined the inside of the painter, stapling the plastic to the inside of the crate; this will protect our crates from the water for the flowers we will put in them. (It’s the perfect size to put two medium size plants in their plastic planters inside the crate, just make sure to poke a few holes in the plastic before watering so the water doesn’t pool in the bottom.)

The final touch for the planter was to apply the vinyl “welcome” to the mini chalk board and then apply some Velcro to the back of the chalkboard to use that to adhere it to the outside of the crate. The best part here is you could make multiple chalkboards and change the saying for various occasions!

Once our planters were down, we needed to drill holes for the handles at each side. There really is no exact place the handles needed to be, so I put them in 1″ from the “edge” of the platter to the middle of the handle. And just as every other handle installation for me goes at Kelly’s, I needed to make a few minor adjustments to get the handles attached 😊

Then, with handles installed and the tray dry, we set the cutting board in the middle and our trays and planters were complete!

Posted in diy

{Creative Palette} Life-size Firecrackers & Pots

May marked what is I think only the 2nd time I didn’t make it to Creative Palette class at 2nd Chance Restoration 😢. Due to a crazy schedule, I just couldn’t make it fit in last month, and boy was I bummed!! Kelly had some great projects, including 3 life size firecrackers that I so wish I was there to make.

For the firecrackers, you just need some 4″x4″ wood, rope, straw ribbon and paint – Kelly used Mineral and Milk paint, specifically because the MMS Milk Paint dries super fast!

To start, it’s time to sand! Once you have sanded a 12″, 18″ and 24″ 4″x4″ on all six sides of each piece, it’s time to paint all four sides white. While you the white paint was drying, you can get started on your pot.

In comparison to other projects we’ve done, the pot is super easy. Around the top rim, glue some twine down and wrap the entire top rim with twine. Additionally, the class added a vinyl saying to the pot: “you grow girl”.

Once all the paint is dry on the firecrackers, apply a 1″ wide piece of tape around the wood where you want the blue area to end, about 1/3 of the way down. Then tape from there to the bottom one each corner – you want to cover everything you want to keep white. Also, on the top, apply some vinyl or tape stars to cover the white stars that you want to have showing. Before painting the other colors, drill a hole on the top, just large enough to stick the end of some rope in, to be the wick on the firework.

Then paint everything above the tape band on the sides blue and paint the lower middle section one each of the four sides red. While you wait for this to dry, you can carefully paint the top white.

The the final step for the firecrackers is to glue the rope in and take off the tape. Then you can take some straw ribbon and wrap it around the firecrackers for a completed look!

Posted in diy

{Creative Palette} Deconstructed Canvas & Wooden Tray

March marked the 1st Creative Palette class of 2019 at 2nd Chance Restoration! As always, Kelly had some amazing rustic/farmhouse designs picked out for our projects. We created a wooden tray and a deconstructed canvas sign during class. The wooden tray was the same one we created in February 2018; it’s important to note that Kelly tries not to do the same project again – but this one was a customer favorite and requested by many, so she caved and did it again.

We started the evening with a project that guest teacher Shauna Rogg was back for, the same Shauna from Cricut 101. Shauna passed out a blank canvas sign, such as this one which can be found at any craft store, to everyone. We took our 8″ x 10″ canvases and using an X-ACTO knife, we cut the canvas right outside the staples on the back of the frame. Once we had the canvas removed from the frame, we laid it down flat underneath the frame and taking the same knife, we trimmed the canvas to be the same size as the outer edge of the frame as we would be applying an iron-on and attaching the canvas to the back of the frame. With the canvas ready, we took our wooden frames into the staining room and stained them. Kelly had three options of stain to pick from – a dark brown, light brown and light grey – I used a mix of the two browns. We then placed the frames on another table to dry and went back to the classroom to begin on the second project; our trays.

Kelly already had the boards cut for us; we needed two 14″ boards, four 21″ boards, 2 handles, 8 screws and sand paper. Step one was to sand all of our boards and assemble our trays upside down. The two 14″ boards which would be on the top of the tray with the handles, were set down on the table at the end of the 21″ boards perpendicular to them, laying on top. Once the trays were set up, we used a power drill to screw the long boards to the short boards from the bottom (so you don’t see them when you have the tray out and in use). We then flipped the trays right side up and measured out where we would be installing the handles, marking the spots for the handles to be attached with a permanent marker. Then we headed back into the staining room to stain the tray. Last year I made a grey one, so this year I made a light brown one – the trays were then put on Kelly’s drying rack to dry.

While our trays dried, we cleaned up our tables, grabbed our frames that were now dry and then got a pre-made iron-on from Shauna which said “home sweet home”. We decided where on the canvas we would put the iron-on. Many people put their phrase centered and straight, but I wanted to make mine on an angle, because I don’t like to follow all the directions exactly. Then we used Shauna’s t-shirt press to adhere our iron-on to the canvas. We let them cool a little bit and then removed the plastic from the canvas and got it ready to assemble our final product. To finish the frame, we laid the frame down upside-down, and put the canvas upside-down on top of it, so the blank side of the canvas was facing us. Then we took a staple gun to attach the canvas to the back of the frame, and viola, we had our finished product!

It was then time to grab our dry trays and finish those up. We started by drilling holes for the handles through the tray from the top down. Then we countersunk the holes from the bottom, about 3/4 of the way through one board so the screws would reach into the handles. We then used a phillips head screwdriver to attach the drawer pulls to make our trays complete!

Posted in diy

Cricut 101

In December I got myself a Cricut Maker and used it to make Christmas presents but hadn’t used it much since. With no Creative Palette classes at 2nd Chance Restoration yet for 2019, I was super excited when a Cricut 101 class was announced for late February.

The class was held in the same location as the Creative Palette classes, but had a guest teacher; Shauna Rogg. Shauna and Kelly had the classroom set up for us when we arrived. The benches had plenty of power cords for everyone who brought their Cricut with them and they even had both of theirs available for anyone, like me, who didn’t bring their Cricut. All that was required for class was to bring your computer or iPad to log into Design Space.

We made two projects in class that night – a cutting board and a dish towel. The first project we made was the cutting board with a vinyl decal on it. The cutting boards were 8″x8″ squares with four feet on the bottom; you can buy cutting boards like this at the dollar store, but really any size clear cutting board would do. We used border #M8109136 as the main element and then I used Soirée Lettering – Grace Script for my word to put in the middle of the border. When we started making the projects, it dawned on me that the cutting board would be a great birthday present for my Grandma, so I used her last name in the middle. After sizing the border to the right size, I ensured the word was centered in the middle and then welded it together. Before sending the project to the Cricut, we also attached and flattened it all. Once on the printing screen, we needed to be sure to mirror the image since we would be applying it to the cutting board from the bottom. The hardest part of the night was the weeding; since the border had so many aspects, making sure you were only weeding the excess was tricky, but we all did it. Once the weeding was done, we laid out some contact paper to use for the transfer and then laid it down on the table, sticky side up. The final step was to center the vinyl on the cutting board, which was not too hard using the feet of the cutting board to temporarily put it down and once it was centered, then flipping it over and pressing the vinyl onto the cutting board before removing the transfer paper. Our final products came out so well!

Just like I used a different font for mine, there was someone who used a different border for theirs and it came out fabulously!!!

Once we all had our cutting boards done, it was time for the dish towels which we did with iron ons. Shauna got flour sack dish towels from Amazon and prewashed and ironed them for the project. Step one was to find the image of the state of Connecticut with the word home written across it. Once we had that, we inserted the heart shape over the portion of the state where our town was located.

Then using the slicer tool, we removed the heart and left ourselves with a blank heart inside the state. Then most of us added “is where the heart is” text underneath. We were now ready to print the iron-on by mirroring it and then weeding out the excess material. Once the iron-on was ready, we positioned it on the hand towel and used Shauna’s industrial t-shirt press to apply it, but you just need an iron or a Cricut Easy Press to do it yourself. The final outcome was so cute!

While I had used vinyl before, I had never thought to mirror it and apply from behind the material, and this was my first go at making an iron-on. The class was great, Shauna even sent us home with a small handout with notes from her on tips and tricks to remember when using our Cricuts. This isn’t going to be the last Cricut 101 class 2nd Chance Restoration holds, so if you’re like me and need to use your machine a bit more, you should keep your eye out and make it to one of the classes!!