Posted in diy

{Creative Palette} Life-size Firecrackers & Pots

May marked what is I think only the 2nd time I didn’t make it to Creative Palette class at 2nd Chance Restoration 😢. Due to a crazy schedule, I just couldn’t make it fit in last month, and boy was I bummed!! Kelly had some great projects, including 3 life size firecrackers that I so wish I was there to make.

For the firecrackers, you just need some 4″x4″ wood, rope, straw ribbon and paint – Kelly used Mineral and Milk paint, specifically because the MMS Milk Paint dries super fast!

To start, it’s time to sand! Once you have sanded a 12″, 18″ and 24″ 4″x4″ on all six sides of each piece, it’s time to paint all four sides white. While you the white paint was drying, you can get started on your pot.

In comparison to other projects we’ve done, the pot is super easy. Around the top rim, glue some twine down and wrap the entire top rim with twine. Additionally, the class added a vinyl saying to the pot: “you grow girl”.

Once all the paint is dry on the firecrackers, apply a 1″ wide piece of tape around the wood where you want the blue area to end, about 1/3 of the way down. Then tape from there to the bottom one each corner – you want to cover everything you want to keep white. Also, on the top, apply some vinyl or tape stars to cover the white stars that you want to have showing. Before painting the other colors, drill a hole on the top, just large enough to stick the end of some rope in, to be the wick on the firework.

Then paint everything above the tape band on the sides blue and paint the lower middle section one each of the four sides red. While you wait for this to dry, you can carefully paint the top white.

The the final step for the firecrackers is to glue the rope in and take off the tape. Then you can take some straw ribbon and wrap it around the firecrackers for a completed look!

Posted in diy

{Creative Palette} Deconstructed Canvas & Wooden Tray

March marked the 1st Creative Palette class of 2019 at 2nd Chance Restoration! As always, Kelly had some amazing rustic/farmhouse designs picked out for our projects. We created a wooden tray and a deconstructed canvas sign during class. The wooden tray was the same one we created in February 2018; it’s important to note that Kelly tries not to do the same project again – but this one was a customer favorite and requested by many, so she caved and did it again.

We started the evening with a project that guest teacher Shauna Rogg was back for, the same Shauna from Cricut 101. Shauna passed out a blank canvas sign, such as this one which can be found at any craft store, to everyone. We took our 8″ x 10″ canvases and using an X-ACTO knife, we cut the canvas right outside the staples on the back of the frame. Once we had the canvas removed from the frame, we laid it down flat underneath the frame and taking the same knife, we trimmed the canvas to be the same size as the outer edge of the frame as we would be applying an iron-on and attaching the canvas to the back of the frame. With the canvas ready, we took our wooden frames into the staining room and stained them. Kelly had three options of stain to pick from – a dark brown, light brown and light grey – I used a mix of the two browns. We then placed the frames on another table to dry and went back to the classroom to begin on the second project; our trays.

Kelly already had the boards cut for us; we needed two 14″ boards, four 21″ boards, 2 handles, 8 screws and sand paper. Step one was to sand all of our boards and assemble our trays upside down. The two 14″ boards which would be on the top of the tray with the handles, were set down on the table at the end of the 21″ boards perpendicular to them, laying on top. Once the trays were set up, we used a power drill to screw the long boards to the short boards from the bottom (so you don’t see them when you have the tray out and in use). We then flipped the trays right side up and measured out where we would be installing the handles, marking the spots for the handles to be attached with a permanent marker. Then we headed back into the staining room to stain the tray. Last year I made a grey one, so this year I made a light brown one – the trays were then put on Kelly’s drying rack to dry.

While our trays dried, we cleaned up our tables, grabbed our frames that were now dry and then got a pre-made iron-on from Shauna which said “home sweet home”. We decided where on the canvas we would put the iron-on. Many people put their phrase centered and straight, but I wanted to make mine on an angle, because I don’t like to follow all the directions exactly. Then we used Shauna’s t-shirt press to adhere our iron-on to the canvas. We let them cool a little bit and then removed the plastic from the canvas and got it ready to assemble our final product. To finish the frame, we laid the frame down upside-down, and put the canvas upside-down on top of it, so the blank side of the canvas was facing us. Then we took a staple gun to attach the canvas to the back of the frame, and viola, we had our finished product!

It was then time to grab our dry trays and finish those up. We started by drilling holes for the handles through the tray from the top down. Then we countersunk the holes from the bottom, about 3/4 of the way through one board so the screws would reach into the handles. We then used a phillips head screwdriver to attach the drawer pulls to make our trays complete!